GUEST LECTURE BY FORMER MEMBER OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

 

dsc_590814 December, 2016

DES, Manipal University

MANIPAL UNIVERSITY HOSTS GUEST LECTURE BY FORMER MEMBER OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, AMELIA ANDERSDOTTER ON DATA PROTECTION IN THE EU

As the world slowly transcends into a digital age, entangled in the World Wide Web, the notion of data protection and related policy initiatives become ever so important. Data is a semi-property and therefore data protection and transfer are a great concern, said Amelia Andersdotter at the guest lecture organised by the Department of European Studies (DES), Manipal University.

Amelia Andersdotter, former MEP (Member of the European Parliament) from 2011 – 2015, became involved in politics as early as 2006 when she became a member of the Pirate Party in Sweden, focusing on notions of piracy, Intellectual Property Rights and other connected aspects that continued to be her focus throughout. At the moment, she runs a Non-Profit organisation in Sweden called ‘Dataskydd.net’ that provides policy advice for governments in the field of cyber security, copyrights, etc. She is currently working with the Centre for Internet and Society (CIS), Bangalore.

The focus of the talk was EU and the free flows of data with respect to Data Protection Regulation, Trade, and Law Enforcements. Light was shed on the history and evolution of policy with specific reference to EU Data Protection Regulation. The scope of the lecture was not limited to this, as she touched upon the role played by law and legal institutions as well as the incongruence between policy initiatives at the EU level and that at the level of a Member State. Data protection, she said, is a political challenge, when the law exists but there is no will. Lack of resources was also cited as a challenge.

Closer to home, she spoke about the role of India in this sphere, making a valid argument in the case of outsourcing of work to India with provisions of access to European Servers without any Data Protection agreement between the actors. She substantiated this by mentioning that perhaps the engineers in India have been unable to comprehend the geopolitical significance of having such a policy in the cybersphere.

In the question-answer session, issues such as the relative importance of data collection to data storage and transfer were raised wherein she spoke of data minimisation. The notion of the rights of the people as against the security of the state was also discussed in great depth.

The thank-you note was delivered by Vladan Lausevic, visiting faculty from Sweden, currently teaching Masters’ students at the Department. Prof Neeta Inamdar, Head of the Department, felicitated Ms Andersdotter to mark the end of an insightful evening.